Blog Post 2

Confined Space Safety

Posted by Jason on September 22, 2010


CONFINED SPACE SAFETY

Confined spaces can be very hazardous. They may appear to be clean and safe. This appearance may lure you into a false sense of security. In reality, a confined space may lack sufficient oxygen, contain toxic gases or even explosive vapors.

A "confined space" is defined as "an enclosed area with limited access, large enough to allow a person to enter and do work and with restricted or no air flow"

Some examples of confined spaces:

The bow tanks, the stern tanks and the wing tanks of a barge
The bilge area, shaft alleys, rudder rooms and some gear storage areas
Potable water tanks and fuel tanks built into the vessel's structure
On-board sewage holding tanks
Covered hopper barges when the covers are closed
Cargo tanks of liquid tank barges
Empty tanks located above deck on barges
The flood compartments of dry docks

CONFINED SPACE HAZARDS:

1. OXYGEN DEFICIENCY
2. TOXIC GASES
3. EXPLOSIVE VAPORS

We want to protect you from these hazards. Carline rules state you are NOT to enter a confined space without a Confined Space Entry Certificate. It is up to you to follow the company's CONFINED SPACE POLICY and the specific guidelines established for your job.


Source: The Deckhand's Manual